Welcome


Magical light creates stunning visions in Alexander Wainwright’s landscape paintings. His most recent painting, The Hay Wagon, is a marvelous, moonlit scene, with an old-fashioned hay wagon dominating the foreground, with a beautiful, unearthly glow. Yet, at the pinnacle of his career, he is about to lose his muse.

Not everyone appreciates his work. Rinaldo, a conceptual artist, mocks Alexander’s bourgeois love of beauty, believing Alexander’s success proves that the universe is chaotic and absurd. Determined to undermine, humiliate and ultimately destroy his rival, he defaces Alex’s painting.

Alexander brushes off the attack, but soon he has a frightening vision of misshapen, human-like creatures. These trolls start appearing in his art, and he is beset by questions. Who are these ugly beings? Has he lost both his light and his art?

The creatures lead Alexander to journey from London to Venice and from Toronto to New York as he seeks to understand their meaning. He meets many people, each with a story to tell. Meanwhile, Rinaldo waits in New York City, intent on settling a score in The Drawing Lesson.

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About Mary E. Martin

Mary E. Martin grew up in Toronto, Canada. After earning an Honors Degree in History at the University of Toronto, she graduated with her law degree from Queens University, Kingston, Ontario. In 1973, she was called to the Bar of Ontario and began the general practice of law in Toronto, with emphasis on real estate, wills and estates and elder-care law. This law practice of more than 30 years was a great inspiration for The Osgoode Trilogy ("Conduct in Question," "Final Paradox" and "A Trial of One.") Her fourth novel, “The Drawing Lesson,” will be the first in the next trilogy, provisionally entitled “The Trilogy of Rmembrance.” She is also a photographer particularly with respect to her travels. She has had two commercial photography shows. Married in 1973, she and her husband live in Toronto. They have three adult children.
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2 Responses to Welcome

  1. Cindy says:

    Mary, why would the artist feel compelled to keep painting the trolls, if he hated them? Why wouldn’t he just stop?

    • Have you ever said or done something completely contrary to your normal behavior? Maybe you promised yourself you would not eat another piece of cake or have another drink. Yet something drives you to break your promise. When that happens, we say—I don’t know what possessed me. That’s how Alex feels—possessed by these poor creatures.

      Right from the first brushstroke, Alexander knows these trolls are important for his art. Immediately, he sympathizes with them and sees they are at least semi-human. But they frighten him terribly because he doesn’t understand them, yet.

      These trolls have come from his subconscious and his rational mind knows that, as an artist, he must pay attention to them. And so, Alex really cannot simply say no to them.

      But if I tell you what the trolls mean, that will spoil the story. Just watch them throughout the novel and see how they change in Alex’s mind and where they lead him.

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